Little autumn leaves

Yellowing birch leaves in our corner of the world means autumn is truly here. Every year, I love seeing their return, the colours so pretty against the backdrop of the sky.

On bright, sunny days, they become golden….

From these little leaves grew the idea for the “Little leaves” mini-kit.

Each kit contains a sprinkling of 10 bondaweb backed leaves and a few cloudberry coloured berries.

Perfect for making mini-quilts, totes, trimming T-shirts and clothes, or making table-runners, like the one in our post. We can’t wait to see how you use your “little leaves” – if you’re sharing on social media, please use the hashtag #AutumnLeavesKit

From our little kit, we made a table runner to brighten up the dining table, teaming it up with some left-over strips, in low volume duck egg blue prints, and white on white – to represent the misty autumn skies 🙂

If you’re making a table runner from your kit you will need:

• Light coloured cotton strips 2 ½” wide

• Little leaves mini-kit (found in the autumn section of the store)

• Lightweight Iron-on interfacing

• Insulating wadding (optional)

• Backing fabric

• Thread

The length and width of your runner can be as long or short as you need it to be, so amounts of backing, wadding, interfacing, and strips will vary depending on the size of your runner. If you’re making a long table runner, and need more than one pack of 10 leaves, additional Autumn leaves Mini-kits are available in store for just £2.

Low volume prints - Lotta Jansdotter (Mormor); Sweetwater; Cotton & Steel

To make the background:

• Sew 2 ½” wide strips of different length end to end, till you have at least 5 long strips measuring the length of your finished item, plus ½” allowance. Press seams open.

• Place the long strips alongside each other, sew together and press seams open.

• Apply the lightweight iron-on interfacing to the back of the block.

Applying the little leaves:

• Simply peel off the bondaweb backing and scatter the leaves on top of the block.

• Once the leaves are in position press for a few seconds using a hot iron.

Then over to the sewing machine….

• Stitch close to the edge of the leaves using either straight stitch or blanket stitch.

• Dark grey thread is used to stitch the centre vein on each leaf and twigs.

To complete the runner

• Simply place quilt top and backing right sides together.

• Sew ¼” from the edge, leaving a small gap through which to turn the runner right side out.

• Using thumb and forefingers, pinch the edges, shaping them to give a nice crisp edge, then press.

• Slip stitch the gap closed.

• Topstitch as close as possible to the edge.

Alternatively, if you prefer the runner can be padded, simply layer your top and bottom layer, right sides together, then insulating wadding. Sew around the edges and leave a slightly bigger gap through which to turn right side out. Quilt to complete.

Now your runners complete, time to pop the kettle on 🙂

Hope you enjoy the little wonders of autumn.

Happy sewing x X


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Flying pinwheels

Hope you’re having a lovely summertime – It’s been quite a breezy one here, just the weather for spinning pinwheels! Our fourth block before piecing and quilting is one of my favourites, it reminds me of happy seaside holidays – pinwheels spinning in the sea breeze, bright and colourful in the sunshine.

In total 4 pinwheels are needed for our Skinny Dippin’ Quilt, each one is made up from 4 very easy to make “ flying geese” units and 4 plain rectangles.

Taking a little extra care early on to cut out pieces to precise measurements, and checking a ¼” seam allowance is used when joining pieces together, makes it easier to match the centre points of the pinwheel, when it comes to joining the units together.

In the completed quilt the pinwheels can be used in the side borders, or even an extra row if you’d like to make a longer Skinny Dippin’ Quilt.

Full instructions for making Flying Pinwheels here.

Happy sewing x

ps. the little pinwheel pictured sunning itself in the title pic, is made from Fast2Fuse, using a super-duper tutorial by Destri which can be found here 🙂
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Bright and breezy buntings

June is here! So it’s time for the second block in our Skinny dippin’ Quilt-along! June’s block is bright and breezy bunting on a summery aqua sky. If you missed the first block to make a neat little row of beach huts, you can still find it here🙂

In total you’ll need 4 rows of bunting, these can be made quickly and easily either using a folded “prairie point” technique or machine pieced method. The machine pieced method uses less material, while prairie points require less sewing, and have a dimensional element to them. If you have any left over charm pack squares these are perfect for either method.

So bring on the bunting!

For the folded “prairie point” bunting you’ll need:

5 – 5” x WOF strips – or 40 charm pack squares

4 – 3½” (11.5cm) x WOF light aqua solid

4 – 2″ (5cm) x WOF light aqua solid

This is enough to make 4 strips of bunting. Each bunting strip will run across the width of the quilt, with other blocks in the Quilt-along eventually to be sewn inbetween the bunting strips.

You’ll find full instructions how to make the prairie point bunting here.

Lewis & Irene’s Coastal “In the Sea” is a really versatile print – lots of variety! There’s little seahorses, crabs, shoals of fish and seaweed which means that different parts of the design can be used to good effect. The bunting units come together very quickly too – they’re such fun to make !

Once you have a pile of points, you simply slot each folded prairie point into the previous one, pin to hold in place, and sew. In no time you have several rows of bunting!

If you’re making the machine pieced bunting you’ll need:

10 – 5” squares in selection prints

40 – 3 ½” x “ light aqua (Moda Bella Solids – Ruby Ice 9900 169)

4 – 2 ½ ” x WOF white cotton (for bunting string)

Just as for the previous technique this makes 4 rows of bunting. Though with this method there’s room for one extra bunting triangle per row.

There’s a little more cutting and sewing than the prairie points method, as you slice the squares diagonally from corner to corner, and trim a corner from the rectangle, but once the cutting out’s been done, it’s simply a matter of chain piecing and joining –

Full instructions to make Machine pieced bunting here

Whichever method you use, we’d love to see your bunting blocks. Please feel free to post your pics to our Honeybee Cloths Facebook page.

Also remember to “like and share” on Facebook or if your not on Facebook leave us a comment below, and you’ll be entered into our draw to win a Coastal Skinny Quarter bundle.

The next block will be here in one months time, so till then happy sewing x
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